Direct Injection, Problems and Solutions | The Fine Print - By Savagegeese

TurboS

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The video below brought to my attention by @ChiliPepper. Savagegeese, Mark, does a great job of explaining why an Oil Catch Can is needed on our engines for preventive maintenance. For your reference when watching this video our Bronco Raptor 3.0L twin turbo engine has Direct Injection (DI).

"Most modern vehicles have a new brand of technology inside their motors, GDI or DI. Gasoline Direct Injection is starting to take over and the development has gone forward. Car makers from Ford, Chevy, Honda, Mazda and much more have adopted this technology. We try and explain what it is, why it was implemented including the problems with carbon buildup, misfires and prevention and other solutions."

 

Apache 8

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The video below brought to my attention by @ChiliPepper does a great job of explaining why an Oil Catch Can is needed on our engines for preventive maintenance. For your reference when watching this video our Bronco Raptor 3.0L twin turbo engines are Direct Injection (DI).

"Most modern vehicles have a new brand of technology inside their motors, GDI or DI. Gasoline Direct Injection is starting to take over and the development has gone forward. Car makers from Ford, Chevy, Honda, Mazda and much more have adopted this technology. We try and explain what it is, why it was implemented including the problems with carbon buildup, misfires and prevention and other solutions."


I am always a bit of a curious skeptic so it would be interesting to me to know what Ford’s position is on this issue.
 
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TurboS

TurboS

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This is the first evidence I've seen on a Bronco Raptor that the Oil Catch Can works.

 

ChiliPepper

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Conclusions (IMHO):
  1. An oil catch can is a must for DI and turbocharged engines aka GTDI, which have significant blow-by in turbo mode. This means BRaptors, which have the 3.0L Ecoboost. [I still wish Ford would have put the 3.5L GEN2 Ecoboost (DPI) in the BRaptor].
  2. Catch can is better than Air/Oil Separators, which recycle the whole mixture back into the engine.
  3. Use premium oil with low volatility.
  4. Use premium fuel (Top Tier) with a high octane rating.
  5. Consider a dual system (positive crankcase ventilation and cylinder head vent) over just a just a single system (cylinder head vent) if you plan to run your turbos a lot (i.e. desert race) or haul your 2-ton work trailer 5 days a week. As @LethalJoe noted, most people will find a single system adequate for their daily driver or weekend toy.
  6. A quality oil catch can must have (a) brass or SS filter, (b) oil diffuser/baffle, and (c) good sized can to catch any oil, water or gas vapors.
  7. Vacuum check valve on cylinder head vent hose (Stage 1).
  8. Vacuum check valve on positive crankcase ventilation hose (Stage 2, optional but recommended).
  9. Consider a larger reservoir can, 150ml or more, if you have a lot of blow-by (typical of turbocharged racers or high-mileage vehicles) or longer interval oil changes.
  10. Check and drain your catch can every oil change if you decide to get one. Verify fill rate in between first few oil changes to understand catch volume.
  11. Depending on where your catch can is located, you may want to consider a drain hose for easy fluid removal.
  12. Be leery of cheap catch cans. You get what you pay for with a $39 item.
 
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Tye

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Conclusions (IMHO):
  1. An oil catch can is a must for DI and turbocharged engines aka GTDI, which have significant blow-by in turbo mode. This means BRaptors, which have the 3.0L Ecoboost. [I still wish Ford would have put the 3.5L GEN2 Ecoboost (DPI) in the BRaptor].
  2. Catch can is better than Air/Oil Separators, which recycle the whole mixture back into the engine.
  3. Use premium oil with low volatility.
  4. Use premium fuel (Top Tier) with a high octane rating.
  5. Consider a dual system (positive crankcase ventilation and cylinder head vent) over just a just a single system (cylinder head vent) if you plan to run your turbos a lot (i.e. desert race) or haul your 2-ton work trailer 5 days a week. As @LethalJoe noted, most people will find a single system adequate for their daily driver or weekend toy.
  6. A quality oil catch can must have (a) brass or SS filter, (b) oil diffuser/baffle, and (c) good sized can to catch any oil, water or gas vapors.
  7. Vacuum check valve on cylinder head vent hose (Stage 1).
  8. Vacuum check valve on positive crankcase ventilation hose (Stage 2, optional but recommended).
  9. Consider a larger reservoir can, 150ml or more, if you have a lot of blow-by (typical of turbocharged racers or high-mileage vehicles) or longer interval oil changes.
  10. Check and drain your catch can every oil change if you decide to get one. Verify fill rate in between first few oil changes to understand catch volume.
  11. Depending on where your catch can is located, you may want to consider a drain hose for easy fluid removal.
  12. Be leery of cheap catch cans. You get want you pay for with a $39 item.
Does the UPR oil catch can kit meet 1, 2, 5, 6, 9, 11 ?
 

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