Jacking for Tire rotation/changing

TurboS

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I'm starting here with a summary of measurement information on the stock Bronco Raptor as I couldn't find these answers anywhere:
  • Bottom of frame at Jack points on stock Bronco Raptor: Front ~14 inches, Rear ~14.5 inches
  • Front tire drop will be 5-5.5 inches (will vary slightly for each BR, especially if additional weight added to front)
  • Frame needs raised ~10 inches to be able to remove front tires provided tires are fully inflated (42 psi), add to the 10" if needed for tire squat due to underinflated tire.
  • Frame needs to be at 24" from floor for front tires (stock 37") to be off the floor.
  • Front fender flare lip at centerline of tire is 49.25 inches from the floor.
  • Front Frame crossmember that front suspension lower A frame attaches to is 23.5" above floor to have full drop (stock 37" tires off the floor).
  • Never accomplished full rear axle drop as I used jackstands under the rear axle due to wanting to keep the Bronco Raptor level while not raising any further than needed.
Safety Note: I never ever go under my vehicles when the tires removed. If I'm working under the vehicle I prefer to use Ramps if possible rather than jack stands as shown here in another thread Elevating for ease of Service.

There is probably better jacking solutions, but this is my first economical attempt with lifting the Bronco Raptor to rotate the tires or hub/brake maintenance.
With my other solid axle 4x4's the task to jack them up is pretty easy under the axles. However I've been pondering how do I safely jack up the Bronco Raptor front with its long travel independant front suspension in my home garage. Ford recommends jacking on the frame bottom, not the lower control arms, so I ordered 4 of these UniJacks along with mating rubber saddles. I liked that these UniJacks is one point of contact vs using a floor jack and jackstands, and the large flat stand base which should be kind to flooring like Racedeck or Swisstrax. The box lists the lifting range is 11"-21" which seemed like 10" of frame lift would be a good initial guess.
Amazon link for UniJack
Amazon link for mating rubber saddles
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However, once I unboxed these UniJacks I realized they do Not have a 10" lift range due to it's adjustable saddle, instead it's approximately 5", and the box should read lowest lift range of 11"-16" and highest lift range of 16.5"-21.5". My fault for not studying the UniJack design and operation prior to purchasing. I still managed to get the BR fully lifted using the combination of the 4 UniJacks on the frame, but required more work that I had planned. I jacked the front up, then rear, then back to the front to add the wooden blocks under the UniJacks and this was possible because the front tires had dropped and swung inward so when the jack was released the front doesn't drop to the starting height. I then still needed to raise the rear axle with a floor jack to place a couple extra 3 ton jack stands under the axle in order to get the rear tires off the floor.

Note that in all the below photo's, the jackstand portion of the UniJack is locked into position and bottle jack portion pump valve has been released.

E68332FA-B1A5-4457-89E6-873FBAE407FB.jpeg


This measurement to the Flare is after the tire is off the floor, started at ~43 inches.

6C5EEC10-ACC6-4D2C-A475-614A69D8B31D.jpeg


Jack below isn't bent, just play in the jackstand adjuster. Note from the floor to the bottom of frame at this front lift point is 24 inches.
B4C2D467-098F-4C47-8723-A84013C1BA9C.jpeg


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Floor to the frame at this rear lift point as shown is 24.5 inches. The rear tires were still on the floor, so I jacked the rear diff up with a floor jack and added the two 3 ton jackstands to support the rear axle enough to get the rear tires off the floor without jacking the entire Bronco Raptor any higher. I ran out of 2x12 blocks so I compromised with some King Starboard strips.
454998A5-E73F-479C-9588-858931524010.jpeg


Below measurement is 23.5 inches once elevated from floor to front frame crossmember (Bash & engine skid plates removed). Added here just for documentation.
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If I should find a better jacking solution I will post here in this thread. I have other vehicles I can use the UniJacks on for storage.

The ideal UniJack for our Bronco Raptors in stock form would be able to raise continuously from 13.75" to 24.5" and lock into place.

These Quick Jacks would be a good solution, but at 2k I would go ahead and get a 4 post lift.
 
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TurboS

TurboS

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I noticed in the Lite Brite video they had a single 12 ton jackstand at the frame front crossmember and appears tow 6 ton jackstands under the A arms. But I'm not sure how they actually got there without multiple bottle jacks and floor jacks.

1679361507943.png
 

412Brap

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Resurrecting this thread as I'm now thinking the same thing. Both for in garage maintenance, but also for jacking on the trail.

I caught a nail in my right rear tire at ~250 miles (lucky me). Side note - if you think you don't have to worry about nails because you have KO2s, do think again! I own an ARB Jack but it wasn't with me at the time, so had to use the scissor jack. Never doing that again. In all honesty, I don't think the scissor jack will last long if you use it regularly.

Now this got me thinking about jack points, especially on the trail. Few questions
1. Has anyone tried to use to jack from the rock sliders/side steps?
2. Any other places people are using for jack points on the trail?

I saw the one video where a guy was talking about "trail essentials" for the BR, where he showed carrying a floor jack. My concern there is there won't always be space/flat ground/solid ground to use a jack like that on trail. Footprint for the Hi-Life/ARB Jack is much smaller.
 

ChiliPepper

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IMHO . . .
In all honesty, I don't think the scissor jack will last long if you use it regularly. True story, for emergency only
1. Has anyone tried to use to jack from the rock sliders/side steps? No; OEM sliders and steps are connected to the body. Use the frame/chasis.
2. Any other places people are using for jack points on the trail? Frame (rear, side, front), rear diff, rear axle, recovery points (may require special adapter), wheels (w/ lift pal).

I have my 3-ton off-road floor jack with me (lifts up to 27"), 3-ton jack stand w/ 18" lift, 2x4 base plate (12x12x4), 12-ton bottle jack w/ 18" stroke, 48" Hi-Lift jack, and traction boards with bottle jack and hi-lift jack adapter (for soft conditions: sand, mud, snow). And thinking outside the box, the Warn 10S winch could lift the front end if a stout tree branch or I-beam was near by. Always remember to support a suspended load.

For tire rotation, I use off-road floor jack and 4 jack stands. For a 5-tire rotation, remember to take the spare off before lifting the BR. Unless you can palm a 105-lb donut. :ROFLMAO:
 
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412Brap

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thanks @ChiliPepper

This is the point I’m making. All the points you mention except recovery points won’t work with a hi lift. Hi lift can’t get to the diff, rear axle, etc.
 

ChiliPepper

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thanks @ChiliPepper

This is the point I’m making. All the points you mention except recovery points won’t work with a hi lift. Hi lift can’t get to the diff, rear axle, etc.
Agreed. Honestly, I had to re-read your post several times to understand that the "jack" you were asking about was not the OEM scissor jack, but the Hi-Lift jack.

My Hi-Lift is mainly for using the Lift Mate and as possible comealong winch. The DLA is a nice tool if you want to lift from the recovery point. A Hi-Lift jack is dangerous if you don't have a solid base. Mine sat on my Jeep for years without use (same as the winch), but when you need it, you're glad to have it. As noted above, I have a variety of lift options because not all off-road situations are a good fit for the Hi-Lift jack.

An off-road floor jack makes a lot more sense for straight up tire rotation and tire swaps on or off the trail. Pro-Eagle and HF Badland 3-ton jacks are top of the line; fast and easy to use.
 
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